What can we learn from the Waikato DHB hack?

Author
Newstalk ZB,
Publish Date
Sat, 29 May 2021, 11:19AM
(Photo / NZ Herald)
(Photo / NZ Herald)

What can we learn from the Waikato DHB hack?

Author
Newstalk ZB,
Publish Date
Sat, 29 May 2021, 11:19AM

What can we learn from the Waikato DHB hack? 

Ransomware is usually added to a system by an individual. There was a very good chance that someone either clicked on a bad link, or opened a bad file (it could even be a Word or Excel doc) which infected the network. It only takes one person to do this. It's crucial that people are on the lookout for phishing scams - you should be very careful about opening things sent to you by unknown senders. These actors will sometimes appear to be legitimate by emulating well-known brands, but you need to be on the lookout for that too.  

You can finally password protect your Google history 

Google has a rather transparent activity page which shows you all the things you've searched for, videos you've watched, places you've been, things you've said to your google assistant and more.. but it's always been quite easy to access which is obviously problematic for a vast range of reasons.  

Now though, you can be forced to re-login before you see that activity. That way you need to verify your identity before getting to see what could be very sensitive data. It's a setting you should turn on today. To do that, activity.google.com and you'll be prompted through it. 

Facebook is taking steps to stop misinformation spreading 

They're making two changes. First, they're going to limit the distribution of posts from people who regularly share things that FB's independent fact checkers have classed as misinformation - I'm surprised this wasn't something they would have been doing for some time. 

Secondly, they're going to put up a warning before someone follows a page that is known to share misinformation. The message explains why the warning is there, but you'll still be able to follow the page anyway.