Mike's Minute: David Seymour and ACT set to be a force in 2023

Author
Newstalk ZB,
Publish Date
Tue, 13 Jul 2021, 9:19AM

Mike's Minute: David Seymour and ACT set to be a force in 2023

Author
Newstalk ZB,
Publish Date
Tue, 13 Jul 2021, 9:19AM

Yesterday on the show we had David Seymour outlining his idea over splitting the GST revenue on new builds between central and local government. That would mean, of course, that local government suddenly had a very large incentive to start approving a few more houses.

There was more to the policy that got officially released later in the day. Removing barriers for financing rent to builds, removing land use rules, introducing builders' insurance, get regulations that match up, in other words if it's allowed in one part of the country, why not another?

He also wants to replace the RMA and give property owners more rights over work and building on their land.

This may, or may not, go somewhere. National would have to be on board because numbers in Parliament are everything, and ACT is a small party.

In that last bit is why I mention the policy. There is a very good reason why ACT is on the rise, not just in the last election, but post it as well. They have made hay in a world where shambles, unprofessional behaviour, and infighting have caused havoc elsewhere.

Labour are a mess of non-delivery, hot air, and amateurism. National has been pre-occupied with leakers and backstabbing. The Māori Party have been busy with ties, hats, and grandstanding. The Greens, to be fair, have been consistent in messaging but are lost in the fact they are sort of part of the government but swallowed by the Labour machine and its attached baggage.

So good old ACT have plugged away. Releasing policy, holding the government to account in a way that has actually got attention, and as a result generally been rewarded for looking like they have their eye on the ball.

If the Roy Morgan poll last week is accurate, it should be no surprise Seymour has overtaken Judith Collins as preferred Prime Minister.

Also note, the fear that the mass increase in caucus size from 1 to 10 could cause havoc has not materialised.

The ideas may, or may not, be your thing. ACT may always be a smallish centre-right party, who knows? But what you can't mark them down on is professionalism, work ethic, policy development, and a real skill or knack in pointing out Labour Party absurdities with pithy one-liners that consistently make the news.

If they can be this effective at this stage of the electoral cycle, they're going to be a force come 2023.