Scott Morrison amongst first Australians to get Covid-19 vaccine

Author
Newstalk ZB / news.com.au,
Publish Date
Mon, 22 Feb 2021, 9:56AM
Scott Morrison receives his jab. (Photo / Twitter)
Scott Morrison receives his jab. (Photo / Twitter)

Scott Morrison amongst first Australians to get Covid-19 vaccine

Author
Newstalk ZB / news.com.au,
Publish Date
Mon, 22 Feb 2021, 9:56AM

Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison was among the first Australians to receive the Covid-19 vaccination in Sydney today, but the historic moment dissolved into giggles when Morrison's attempt at a photo op went wrong.

Jane Milysiak of Marayong was selected to be the first to receive the jab and she did so alongside Prime Minister Scott Morrison at Castle Hill Medical Centre in Sydney's northwest on Sunday morning.

She was all smiles as she received the injection, seated next to Morrison in a face mask emblazoned with the Australian flag.

Like any good politician, Morrison is not one to miss a photo opportunity, so after she received the jab he encouraged her to flash the peace sign for the cameras, saying it meant "V for vaccine".

After a confused few moments, Jane obliged, but turned her hand the other way and inadvertently flipped the nation the bird.

The room erupted into laughter, and the PM quickly pushed Jane's hand down, saying "always front, always front".

Australian Health Minister Greg Hunt said the vaccinations were an important step in building public confidence in the vaccine before the nationwide rollout begins in earnest tomorrow.

"Today the first group of people will be vaccinated, commencing with two of our aged-care residents, our critical aged-care staff, frontline workers," Hunt said.

"We also know that the chief medical officer and the chief nurse and the Prime Minister – in order to provide confidence, the Prime Minister will be the last of that group."

Insiders host David Speers asked whether there was a danger Morrison would be seen as "jumping the queue".

Hunt said there "was a very strong focus on the need for key leaders, not the Parliament, not the Cabinet, not even the leadership group, but a cross-party group, to provide that confidence".

He added that Australian opposition leader Anthony Albanese would be vaccinated this week.

Earlier this month Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said she and her family members will be vaccinated but they weren't the priority - frontline border workers are.

"I will absolutely be vaccinated."

Yesterday, New Zealand's first MIQ worker received the Covid-19 vaccination.

Border and managed isolation and quarantine (MIQ) workers will be the first to be vaccinated.

It's expected to take two to three weeks to vaccinate border workers including cleaners, nurses, security staff, customs and border officials, airline staff, hotel workers and all of their household contacts.

Healthcare, essential workers and those most at risk will follow in the second quarter of the year.

The recommended dose is two jabs, 21 days apart. It's not yet known if people will need to get a new jab each year.

text by James Law, news.com.au