Kerre McIvor: Why don't we have a humanitarian MIQ policy?

Author
Kerre McIvor,
Publish Date
Wed, 14 Jul 2021, 2:03PM
(Photo / NZ Herald)
(Photo / NZ Herald)

Kerre McIvor: Why don't we have a humanitarian MIQ policy?

Author
Kerre McIvor,
Publish Date
Wed, 14 Jul 2021, 2:03PM

If we can let in the Wiggles, even though they didn't fill in the paperwork, if we can suddenly find places in MIQ for hundreds of Kiwis who've been in New South Wales, why did it take such an uproar find a place for the parents of Josh Storer?

Josh is in intensive care after undergoing two brain surgeries and his family, in a zoom call with his doctors, were told there were three options for Josh. 

One, he could die.  Two he could survive but with brain damage, and three he could recover almost back to his old self.  

Josh has been living and working in New Zealand for the past three years - he works for a drainage company - and his family are in the UK.  

The family, naturally, is desperate to be by his bedside. We all know the difference it makes having family with you when you're in dire straits, but Immigration New Zealand said their hands were tied. 

When it comes to granting exemptions on humanitarian grounds, they had to consider a range of factors.

Immigration NZ has now granted a border exemption for the UK-based family to enter the country, following the Heralds conveyance of their desperate plea to join their injured whānau member.

As I say, if the bloody Wiggles can be let into the country, surely we can let in a family whose son has been assaulted and left for dead in our country, without media having to bring attention to it?

Dawn, Josh's Mum, said the family was vaccinated, their bags are packed and they're willing to jump through any hoops to be with their boy.

At the same time, this very week, we have convicted criminal Karel Sroubek staging a behind closed doors appeal to be allowed to stay in NZ.  

So clearly from the Wiggles, to stranded Kiwis, to Czech drug dealers, this government can and will make exceptions to its rules.