Shock images show Taliban's brutality

Author
news.com.au,
Publish Date
Thu, 9 Sep 2021, 10:55AM

Shock images show Taliban's brutality

Author
news.com.au,
Publish Date
Thu, 9 Sep 2021, 10:55AM

The Editor-in-Chief of a daily Kabul newspaper has released shocking images of five of his journalists who were arrested and reportedly beaten by the Taliban. 

Etilaatroz's Zaki Daryabi confirmed the arrests as he shared images of what he claims the Taliban had subjected his reporters to before releasing them. 

It appears that the reporters were detained for simply doing their jobs, reporting on protests against the Taliban in Kabul. 

Daryabi tweeted that the violence against his reporters was "a loud alarm for journalists and all media in Afghanistan". 

Many of the journalists appeared to have been beaten or whipped and some were wearing bandages over wounds following treatment at hospital. 

Earlier, the Taliban had promised international organisations that it will respect the rights of journalists and freedom of expression. 

Local media organisations have expressed concerns since the Taliban took control of Afghanistan in mid-August following the fall of the Western-backed elected government, led by Ashraf Ghani. 

During the former Taliban regime, TV and other sources of entertainment were banned and there were no media to speak of. The Islamic insurgents had killed and threatened journalists throughout its regime. 

Graphic images of Taliban attacks on journalists in Afghanistan have been shared after five reporters were arrested. Photo / AP

Graphic images of Taliban attacks on journalists in Afghanistan have been shared after five reporters were arrested. Photo / AP 

However, the Taliban leadership had asked local media to operate as usual. It had said media will be allowed to criticise anyone, but they should not indulge in character assassination. 

A group of UN human rights experts had called on all countries to provide urgent protection to Afghan journalists and media workers who fear for their lives and face persecution in the war-torn country. 

Taliban fighters patrol in Kabul, Afghanistan. Photo / APTaliban fighters patrol in Kabul, Afghanistan. Photo / AP 

"Journalists and media workers, in particular women, are facing heightened risks since the Taliban's political takeover of Afghanistan," United Nations Human Rights Special Procedures quoted UN experts as saying. 

It comes a day after the Taliban announced the caretaker government of Afghanistan with Mullah Mohammad Hasan Akhund as its top leader. Taliban co-founder Abdul Ghani Baradar has been appointed as the deputy leader of the country. 

-  Mathew Murphy, news.com.au