I'll probably take a sleeping tablet': Conway faces restless night on 99no

Author
NZ Herald,
Publish Date
Mon, 10 Jan 2022, 3:00PM
Devon Conway raises his bat after reaching 50 on day one of the second test. Photo / Getty
Devon Conway raises his bat after reaching 50 on day one of the second test. Photo / Getty

I'll probably take a sleeping tablet': Conway faces restless night on 99no

Author
NZ Herald,
Publish Date
Mon, 10 Jan 2022, 3:00PM

Black Caps batsman Devon Conway may need a bit of help going to sleep tonight. 

Conway finished day one of the second test against Bangladesh unbeaten on 99, having taken a single off the second ball of the final over, before Tom Latham blocked out the last four balls of the day, offering a smiling apology and an arm around his partner's shoulder as the pair walked off. 

It was a glorious day for the Black Caps, departing Hagley Oval at 349-1, but it would still be a nervous night for Conway as he slept with a third test century just one run away. 

"A bit nervous, naturally, but I'll probably take a sleeping tablet to help me go to bed," Conway said to Spark Sport. 

Butterflies are a much better emotion to go to bed with than dejection, which was how Conway would have felt after his side's first-test defeat, but any lingering doubt over whether the Black Caps could bounce back was quickly washed away. 

Latham and Will Young's 148-run opening stand gave Conway the chance to play a positive innings, his unbeaten 99 coming off 148 balls, and he credited the opening pair for the day's dominance. 

"It was special, especially considering the fact we lost the toss," he said. "The way Tommy Latham and Will Young went about their business early doors was pretty special and Tommy Latham was just outstanding to bat throughout the day. I was really grateful to bat alongside him and contribute. It was a good day all around. 

"They were very positive, and just chatting to [coaches Gary Stead and Luke Ronchi] on the sideline I said, 'I want to continue that positive mindset', and look to score as much as possible, put the spinner under pressure, as well to make their seamers come back more. Luckily it paid off." 

Conway's entrance in the 38th over meant he was immediately facing Bangladesh spinner Mehidy Hasan Miraz, whose second ball to the batsman was dispatched for four, before the fourth went down the ground for six. 

"It was a little bit different," Conway said. "I came in facing the spinner first up – it's not normally something I'm used to but I tried to build up the courage to come down the wicket and put him over the top. Thankfully I middled it and that allowed them to push mid-on and mid-off back to alleviate a little bit of pressure." 

That got Conway underway, and 52 overs later he was still standing – a tiring day's work, but perhaps not enough for a restful night's sleep.