Maori didn't hand over sovereignty: report

Author
Corazon Miller, Charlie Greenhalgh,
Publish Date
Fri, 14 Nov 2014, 12:48PM
The flagstaff stands on the Treaty Grounds at dawn on Waitangi Day (Getty)
The flagstaff stands on the Treaty Grounds at dawn on Waitangi Day (Getty)

Maori didn't hand over sovereignty: report

Author
Corazon Miller, Charlie Greenhalgh,
Publish Date
Fri, 14 Nov 2014, 12:48PM

Updated 7:12pm: A treaty specialist says the Waitangi tribunal report released today is factually incorrect.

The tribunal says the rangatira didn't cede sovereignty to the crown, despite this being the intention of the British.

Auckland University of Technology history professor, Paul Moon says this is untrue.

Professor Moon says there's ample evidence proving Britain didn't make the treaty in the aim of gaining sovereignty, which seems to have been ignored. 

Ngati Kahu CEO Anahera Herbert-Graves is happy to know the hapu didn't cede their sovereignty.

Ms Herbert-Graves says although she has not read the full report, she is aware this was one of the key findings.

The tribunal at this stage isn't commenting on what this means for the treaty in modern times, but may be included in its second stage of enquiry.

Flavell hopes report will change public's view

The co-leader of the Maori party hopes the Waitangi tribunal's new report will change how the public views the Treaty.

The tribunal says the the rangatira didn't cede sovereignty to the crown, despite this being the intention of the British.

However that is being challenged by historians.

Maori Part co-leader Te Ururoa Flavell says regardless of conflicting opinions, the report allows for greater discussion around the treaty and what it means for settlements.

“The thing is the tribunal is a reputable body which has given us an outcome which I think is going to have some impact on the Ngapuhi Settlements or those in the North.

"In some sense it’s put the stake in the ground in respect to the treaty.”