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Urgent warning for 'dangerous' lollies

Author
news.com.au,
Publish Date
Tue, 26 Apr 2022, 2:20pm
Shocking images of the Perth child's burns were posted to social media. (Photo / Facebook - CPR Kids)
Shocking images of the Perth child's burns were posted to social media. (Photo / Facebook - CPR Kids)

Urgent warning for 'dangerous' lollies

Author
news.com.au,
Publish Date
Tue, 26 Apr 2022, 2:20pm

Warning: Graphic content

Parents are being warned about the dangers of sour lollies after a young Perth boy suffered burns to his tongue.

Shocking images of the child's burns were posted to social media, showing layers of his tongue blistered from the product's high acidity.

Safety and first aid service CPR Kids posted the photos, saying it hoped to spread awareness around the potentially dangerous treats.

"Sour candy packaging often stipulates that children under 4 shouldn't eat the sweets and that consuming multiple lollies quickly can cause 'temporary irritation to sensitive tongues and mouths'," CPR Kids wrote.

It is not known which brand of lolly the child in the photo consumed, but CPR Kids said Warheads and TNT are brands consumed widely across the country.

Shocking images of the Perth child's burns were posted to social media. Photo / Facebook - CPR Kids

Shocking images of the Perth child's burns were posted to social media. Photo / Facebook - CPR Kids

"We understand that the labels come with warnings, but dentists say the lollies should be avoided altogether due to the acidic coating, regardless of age," CPR Kids wrote.

CPR Kids said "concerning" lab tests on sour lollies found most were more acidic than vinegar.

In a lengthy post to parents, Dental Association of Australia's Jonathon Teoh echoed the warning.

He said the lollies can be "very dangerous" because of the "high level of acid or PH which can cause chemical burns".

Melbourne mum Kristy Wright shared her 4-year-old daughter's painful experience after eating 10 of her brother's sour lollies before feeling a burning pain.

The young girl ran to her mother screaming about pain on her tongue.

"They had burned her tongue, she was beside herself," she told Tiny Hearts Education.

Wright said her daughter had suffered a severe chemical reaction, which left a massive hole in her tongue.

Consumer advocacy group Choice said while the injuries are painful, they are not likely to be permanent.

"The soft tissues of the mouth will usually repair without much problem," a report stated.

"The more insidious issue with sour lollies is their increased potential for irreversibly damaging teeth."

- Lauren Ferri, news.com.au