Sanders isn't giving up on the White House

Author
Newstalk ZB staff ,
Section
World,
Publish Date
Wednesday, 8 June 2016, 7:17AM
Clinton and Sanders (Getty Images).

Bernie Sanders isn't giving up his fight for the White House just yet.

That's despite his Democratic opponent Hillary Clinton appearing to have the party's nomination in the bag.

LISTEN ABOVE: Robert Weiner talks to Rachel Smalley

US Correspondent Jack Tame told Rachel Smalley Sanders is refusing to pull out of the race.

"Bernie Sanders is vowing to fight on. He says he's going to change the minds of some of those super delegates who are going to be supporting Hillary Clinton."

CNN's Chris Frates said the campaign isn't over yet.

"His campaign released a statement arguing that super delegates can change their minds before the July convention saying quote: 'It is wrong to count the votes of super delegates before they actually vote at the convention.'"

Sky's Amanda Walker said Sanders has pushed Hillary Clinton all the way.

"He really took her on. In the beginning he was viewed as a fringe candidate but he consistently drew huge crowds, lots of young voters that Hillary Clinton needs to do a lot of work to appeal to now."

CNN's Chris Frates said the campaign isn't over yet.

"[Bernie's] campaign releasing a statement arguing that super delegates can change their minds before the July convention saying quote: 'It is wrong to count the votes of super delegates before they actually vote at the convention.'"

Sky's Amanda Walker said Sanders has pushed Clinton all the way.

"He really took her on. In the beginning he was viewed as a fringe candidate but he consistently drew huge crowds, lots of young voters that Hillary Clinton needs to do a lot of work to appeal to now."

Former White House spokesman for Bill Clinton Robert Weiner told Rachel Smalley Hillary Clinton has to pick up the millennials Sanders won over in his campaign.

Today is the final significant day of voting in the presidential primaries, six states are voting, with the largest number of delegates up for grabs in California.

Mr Weiner told Rachel Smalley Clinton needs the votes from the generations who hit adulthood in the early 2000s.

"Hillary has got to reach out. That's what's got to change now. She's got to reach out to Bernie's kids because they were a powerful force and we need them to make sure, in what could be biased or not, a close election, Hillary has the support she needs to win the general election."

Tomorrow is thought to be the day Barack Obama will formally back Hillary Clinton to replace him as President of the United States.

His endorsement would be a major boost for the former Secretary of State, even though some delegate counts already have her with the numbers.

In New Zealand, Clinton may not have been their first choice, but Democrats living in this country are getting in behind her.

Democrats Abroad New Zealand chair Kat Allikian said local poll results show more Americans here were backing Bernie Sanders.

"That said, really the overwhelming majority of people within Democrats Abroad take the approach of vote blue no matter who, and blue is the colour of the Democrats."

Hillary's already said Bill Clinton will be a central cog in the running of America's economy and Mr Weiner said he'd do a good job.

"There were 23 million jobs and a balanced budget during the Clinton adminstration, the last time that's happened. And how did that happen? Because of tax breaks, not for the rich but the middle and lower."

SKY's Hannah Thomas Peter said Hillary Clinton knows there's a huge hurdle ahead in the form of Donald Trump.

"To withstand the inevitable onslaught and to finally shatter that glass ceiling Clinton needs a united party and at the moment she doesn't have it."

Meanwhile, Trump's again landed himself in hot water with his own party after comments he made about a US judge.

A judge of Hispanic descent is presiding over a lawsuit against Trump, and Trump's said the judge will be bias against him because of his ethnicity.

But the judge... is American, born to Mexican parents.

US Correspondent Jack Tame said that hasn't gone down well, especially with speaker of the house, Paul Ryan.

"The speaker has come out this morning and said he considers Donald Trump's remarks to be flat out racist. Textbook definition of a racist comment."

Ryan said he regrets Trump making those comments.

"I do think these kind of comments under cut these things and I'm not even going to pretend to defend them. I'm going to defend our ideas. I'm going to defend our agenda."

A Trump campaign spokeswoman Katrina Pierson believes he'll still be president.

"When it comes to November, people are not going to be concerned with what the media is saying Donald Trump said or how he said it. They're going to be thinking about their futures, they're going to be thinking about jobs, the economy, are we safe."

Trump in the past has said a wall should be built on the border with Mexico.

The final Super Tuesday contests has voters in California, New Jersey, Montana, New Mexico, North Dakota and South Dakota declaring their views.

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